Is your family exposing themselves to cybercrime?

CYBER SECURITY SERIES – KEEPING YOUR FAMILY SAFE ONLINE

Tips to keep you and your family safe from cybercrime.

 Most kids are incredibly savvy when it comes to using the internet – but make sure they follow safe computing practices, so they don’t expose themselves or their household to cybercrime. Fortunately, there are some great resources you can use to help teach your kids how to stay safe online.

Cybercrime campaigns often start with an email that attempts to convince someone to install unauthorised software on their computer, or asks them to provide personal information. This can result in financial loss or other negative consequences. The good news is there are easy steps you can take to keep yourself and your family safe online. By understanding more about cybercrime and how cybercriminals target their victims, you can learn to recognise potential scams and adopt safe online behaviour.

KEEPING YOUR FAMILY SAFE ONLINE

  • Talk to your kids about what they are doing online and who they’re connecting with
  • Tell your children not to give out personal information about themselves or the family
  • Set clear boundaries and time limits on the use of technology
  • Keep up-to-date with the latest trends, technology and apps to encourage family discussions on online safety
  • Consider using parental controls to restrict access to certain apps, games or websites
  • Talk about cyberbullying with your children as soon as they start using social media sites or a mobile phone

RESOURCES WORTH CHECKING OUT

  1. The award-winning ThinkUKnow program offers training to help you guide your kids in the digital world, visit www.thinkuknow.org.au
  2. If you think your child is being bullied online, visit the Children’s e-Safety Commissioner website at www.esafety.gov.au
  3. The Raising Children Network has resources to use with for kids of all ages, from toddlers to teens, visit www.raisingchildren.net.au

TYPES OF CYBERCRIME

Online scams
Schemes that seek to take advantage of individuals by presenting a solicitous offer (such as a free or cheap holiday) that turns out to be dishonest or non-existent.
Identity fraud
Illegally accessing an individual’s information and using this information to steal money or other benefits.
Malware & ransomware
Malicious software designed to gain unauthorised access to an individual’s computer system. Typically used to steal data, destroy data, or to prevent the user from being able to access their files, holding them to ‘ransom’ and extorting users for payment.
Phishing
An email pretending to be from a legitimate, trusted company (such as a bank or other service provider) that attempts to trick an individual into providing their personal or financial information.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON CYBER SECURITY

If you’d like more information on cyber security, including keeping personal information secure, speak to a financial adviser.

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